Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Kiss Classic CCR Configurations

     Currently I am using a Kiss Classic CCR, with a DiveRite Nomad BCD with some slight modifications, which can be seen in more detail in my Sidemount write up.  Personally I believe the Kiss Classic is the best choice for me and can be dove off the shelf with barely any modifications compared to any of the other units.  It is a mechanically assisted unit with backmounted counterlungs, and BOV, meeting my three requirements of a CCR.  These requirements allow the CCR to have no electronic control, it keeps my chest clean (No counterlungs getting in the way or potential for puncturing a hole in them) and can be switched to open circuit with a flip of a switch.
Note: When speaking about left and right it is being described as being worn by the diver.

a) Nomad w/ Deep Sea Supply Tail-plate

Rebreather Configuration
     Below describes the two different configurations I use on my rebreather: the first being the standard configuration with both on board diluent and oxygen tanks and the other is a dual oxygen configuration where
 both on board tanks are oxygen and the diluent gas is supplied from the bailout tank.  In both configurations the manifold that comes with the Kiss Classic is completely removed. 

Tradition Setup
     The oxygen side is on the right side and starts with the stock regulator with delrin plug.  Connected to this regulator is a button SPG, OPV and a 28” LP regulator hose.  The female end of the regulator hose attaches to a micron filter (Omni Swivel, FH-15).  Then the filter connects to 3/8”-24 female to 7/16”-20 male adapter (Omni Swivel, SZF-XM), which connects to the stock manual add valve (MAV).  Connected to the outlet port of the MAV is another 3/8”-24 female to 7/16”-20 male adapter (Omni Swivel, SZF-XM), this connects to the male end of an 18” LP regulator hose and the female end is connected to the elbow attached to the head of the CCR.


b) Oxygen Setup


                  
c) Close up of the MAV & 1st Stage w/ all Components
.
       This system is very similar to the stock setup of the oxygen side, but the hoses are shorter allowing for a more streamline system.  The button SPG is all that is needed; there is no reason to have another hose and SPG hanging over the diver’s shoulder.  Check the oxygen pressure before the dive and you either have enough to do the dive or you do not.  The OPV is there to protect the LP hose or MAV from blowing up in the event the intermediate pressure rises in the 1st stage.

       The diluent side is on the left side of the rebreather and starts with the stock regulator that comes with the Kiss Classic, and attached is a small button gauge SPG and OPV.  For wing inflation a 26” LP inflator hose is connected to the diluent 1st stage, and it points up when attached to the diluent tank.  A 22” LP regulator hose connects to the 1st stage, and the female end of the regulator hose attaches to a check valve (Omni Swivel, CV-1).

d) Diluent Setup

                    
e) Close up of the Inflation hose, Check valve & Diluent 1st Stage

     Again the 1st stage has an OPV and button SPG for the same reason listed already.  The check valve is attached to keep water out of the rebreather should there be some kind of failure to the onboard diluent system.

     The regulator hose (blue in picture) attached to the oxygen 1st stage runs up the inside of the counterlung case over the diver’s right shoulder and is secured down to the Nomad shoulder strap with a small bungee.  On the diluent side both hoses run up through the inside of the counterlung case.  The inflator hose goes over the diver’s left shoulder and connected to the BCD inflator.  The regulator hose with check valve is attached to the elbow swivel on the top of the rebreather.

     
f) Hoses coming over the diver's shoulders & secured down and Check Valve attached to head

       The last part of the gas addition system is the BOV, which I believe is a must have when diving a rebreather and it allows you to streamline and eliminate a lot of extra connections, blocks, etc.  On the inlet of the 2nd stage attach a male quick disconnect (Omni Swivel, QDM-YF), this will allow you to connect a female quick disconnect (Omni Swivel, QDF-YM) and each of the diver’s bailout tanks should have the female quick disconnect.

g) BOV with Male Quick Disconnect
           
       The bottom mix bailout bottle should be equipped with three hoses.  A 7’ regulator hose, which is bungeed to the tank connected to a 2nd stage.  This allows the CCR diver to help an OOG diver and have a high performance 2nd stage incase the BOV doesn’t meet the diver’s breathing demand in an emergency situation.  The second hose is a LP inflator hose that is also bungeed to the tank and acts as a backup incase one of the diver’s inflation should fail.  The last hose should be a 34” regulator hose connected to a 90 degree adapter which is then connected to a female quick disconnect (Omni Swivel, QDF-YM).  The tank is connected to the left side of the diver, with the tail clipped to the Nomad tail-plate and the tank valve rides in the bungee (aka Sidemount), making sure the 1st stage is facing the diver’s body to protect from damage.

h) Bottom Bailout Tank, with Regulator

       The regulator hose with the quick disconnect comes up from the bailout tank on the diver’s left side, goes around the back of their neck and connected to the BOV.  This setup gives the diver instant access to their OC gas supply and the diver can add diluent to the loop by inhaling from OC and exhaling back in to the loop.  Therefore eliminating any need for extra MAV, manifolds, shut off switches, etc.

i) Bailout tank connect to BOV

       When additional bailout tanks are required the 2nd tank would be sidemounted on the diver’s right side and the regulator is setup like a normal stage/deco regulator would be, with the exception that all 2nd stages need to have a quick disconnect (Omni Swivel, QD-YF-S).  As more tanks are added attach them as you would stages when Sidemount diving (See my Sidemount write up for more detail).

       This traditional setup is used mostly for ocean diving, and it is recommended to try and keep your bailout tanks to no more then two.  With more then two tanks, it gets more complicated, harder to gear up on land, requires more work entering/exiting the boat and makes swimming harder especially in a current.  List below is what I use for diluent and bailout for certain depths and bottom times.

Depth
Time
Algorithm
Dil:
10/50
Tanks
250-240
25
VPM-B/O
B/O:
17/42
AL80
230-220
30
VPM-B/O

21%
AL80
210-200
35
VPM-B/O

100%
AL40
Depth
Time
Algorithm
Dil:
14/33
Tanks
200-190
30
VPM-B
B/O:
20/31
AL80
180-170
35
VPM-B

32%
AL80
160-150
40
VPM-B



Depth
Time
Algorithm
Dil:
21%
Tanks
150
35
VPM-B
B/O:
25%
AL80
140-130
40
VPM-B

50%
AL40
120
45
VPM-B



110
50
VPM-B



100
55
VPM-B





Dual Oxygen Setup
       This setup contains two oxygen bottles, one on the left and other on the right.  The oxygen system on the right side starts with the stock regulator with delrin plug.  Connected to this 1st stage is, a button SPG, OPV and a 28” LP regulator hose (blue hose in picture).  The female end of the regulator hose attaches to a micron filter (Omni Swivel, FH-15).  Then the filter connects to 3/8”-24 female to 7/16”-20 male adapter (Omni Swivel, SZF-XM), which connects to the stock MAV.  Connected to the outlet port of the MAV is another 3/8”-24 female to 7/16”-20 male adapter (Omni Swivel, SZF-XM), connected to 3/8”-24 male to 9/16”-18 female adapter (Omni Swivel, SZM-YFI), connected a check valve (Omni Swivel, CV-1) and the check valve is attached to dual ported side of a Y block (Omni Swivel, MB-Z2).

j) Right side Oxygen Addition System

       The left side consist of the stock regulator (Oxygen Cleaned), again with both a button SPG and OPV attached.  A 36” regulator hose (blue hose in picture) is also attached to the 1st, the female hose end connects to the inlet port of an Omni Swivel MAV (Omni Swivel, MIV-1).  The outlet port of the aftermarket MAV connects to a 3/8”-24 male to 9/16”-18 female adapter (Omni Swivel, SZM-YFI), this is connected to a check valve (Omni Swivel, CV-1), and the check valve is connect to the remaining port on the dual ported side of the Y-block.

k) Left side Oxygen Addition System


       The regulator hose with stock MAV (blue hose in the left of the picture) from the right sided oxygen bottle is routed along the inside of the counterlung case and over the diver’s right shoulder.  The regulator hose with aftermarket MAV (blue hose in the right of the picture) from the left sided oxygen bottle is routed along the inside of the counterlung case, behind the diver’s neck and down over their right shoulder.  The two MAVs rest on each other on the diver’s chest (stock MAV is behind aftermarket MAV shown in picture).  The single port of the Y-block is attached to 9/16”-18 male to 3/8”-24 female adapter (Omni Swivel, SZF-YM), which is connected to the male end of an 18” LP regulator hose and the female end is connected to the elbow attached to the head of the CCR.

                  
l) Both front & back of the Oxygen Addition Systems w/ Routed Hoses

       The diluent gas system addition consists of a 22” LP regulator hose with the male end connected to the swivel elbow at the top of the CCR head, the female end of the regulator hose attaches to a male quick disconnect with check valve (Omni Swivel, QDM-CV-YM).  The diluent hose comes from the top of the rebreather’s head, over the diver’s right shoulder and through the right diver’s chest d-ring.

m) Diluent Addition System

       The bailout/diluent should be split up in to two separate tanks, this allows for redundancy in case one tank fails the diver still has backup diluent.  The left bottle consist of three hoses, a 7’ hose secured to the tank (To assist OOG diver), a LP inflator hose (For BCD inflation) & 34” LP regulator hose with 90 degree adapter and female quick disconnect (To connect Bailout to BOV).  The right bottle consist of a LP regulator hose to be used as backup in the event you have some kind of inflation failure and a 22” LP regulator hose with a 2nd stage connected through a quick disconnect.


n) Left & Right Bailout Tanks w/ Regulators

       Both tanks are worn in a Sidemount configuration and stages can be added just like in the previous example.  The inflator hose on the left tank travels straight up from the regulator, up the diver’s chest, is bent back down and connected to the inflator.  The 34” regulator hose travels straight up from the 1st stage around the back of the diver’s neck and clipped in to the BOV.  The right bottle’s LP hose travels straight down from the 1st stage and secured to the tank.  The regulator hose travels down the tank and the back up towards the valve.  The 2nd stage is removed and placed in a pocket, and the quick disconnect is connected to the male check valve on the diluent hose going in to the head of the rebreather.

o) Diver wearing dual oxygen setup w/ bailout

  
                 
p) Close up of the diver's Left Side & Right Side

       The advantages of having the dual oxygen configuration like this is both systems are isolated from each other; therefore if one of the two sides fails you have redundancy.  The single failure point of this dual setup is the regulator hose coming from the Y-block to the head of the rebreather.  I prefer this over opening another hole in the head of the rebreather to attach a second oxygen bottle, although it will do the job, from other setups I have seen, it is my belief this system has more fail safes and minimum connections.   By having two diluent/bailout bottles if one bottle were to fail the diver can still add diluent and/or inflation to the system from the bottle that has not failed.  If the diver has to bailout they can switch to the BOV or go to the 7’ hose 2nd stage and while exiting can remove the 2nd stage from their pocket and connect it to the left bottle.

1 comment:

  1. On my first dive, I didn't know that the 90 degree adapter was also the male end to the BOV. Luckily someone else set everything up for me, haha.

    ReplyDelete